Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    1
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Deciding to Become a Farmer

    It's very simple in 1 2 3 steps:

    1 - Decide why you're interested in farming. It's hard work, and the industry is, for the most part, steeped in tradition (i.e. newcomers aren't exactly welcomed with open arms). If you've never farmed a day in your life, you're going to get a lot of raised eyebrows from farmers and non-farmers alike. Be ready to answer the question "Why do you want to farm?" with confidence.

    2 - Choose what kind of farming you'd like to do. There are many sub-fields in agriculture such as:

    • Dairy (milk and cheese)
    • Grains (wheat, corn, oats, etc.)
    • Meat (beef, pork, lamb, poultry, eggs)
    • Vegetables & greens
    • Fruit orchards
    • Vineyards
    • Herbs
    • Organic
    • Fiber (wool, angora, etc.)

    Do you want to specialize in one of the above, or do a little bit of everything? The trend in agriculture is towards commercialization and specialization. Generally, the larger the farm, the less diversified it is.

    3 - Find farms that you like. There might be some in your area, there might not. Ask around. Search the Web, and find out about county fairs and visit them. It's there that you'll find serious farmers. Talk to them. Ask them what they do, how their farms have changed over time, what direction they think the field is going in, and if you could stop by their farm and visit some time. Farmers are generally friendly, humble, and welcoming people, though some are more guarded than others.

    Remember, a farmer's political views depend a lot on their location and specific work. For example, a chicken farmer in Tennessee is probably a bit more conservative than an organic herb grower in Oregon. In either case, it's best to keep your political beliefs, as well as religious views, to yourself.

    4 - Dress the part. This may sound superficial, but if you walked into a law firm interview dressed in a pair of jeans and boots, it's the same as walking onto a farm wearing a pair of dockers and loafers. If you're just starting out in farming, you're probably going to be doing a lot of physical labor. Wear a clean t-shirt, jeans, and work boots. Invest in a good pair of work gloves because your hands will be sore and full of blisters in a very short time. If you have long hair, tie it back (consider a braid) so it doesn't get caught in anything.

    5 - Become an apprentice. Offer your services as a laborer. This is the most critical step in becoming a farmer-working in exchange for an opportunity to learn. Since you're just starting out, you'll be entering at the bottom of the totem pole (as is the case in most careers). If you want to earn respect, you must:

    Be physically fit. If you think you can farm without crouching, bending, lifting, or pulling, you're being unrealistic. Only farm managers who've paid their dues can skip some physical labor, but even they often must push their bodies close to the limit for the job.

    Be flexible. You must be willing to do anything and everything that needs to get done on a working farm. This may include: cleaning feces and urine, climbing ladders, driving a tractor on steep hillsides (which is very dangerous), killing pests like rats and rabbits, handling unruly animals (that may want to bite or trample you), weeding or harvesting for 12 hours or more, applying pesticides, slaughtering, butchering, euthanizing, etc. Farming isn't just rainbows and butterflies, you know. If there's something you're not willing to do, state it up-front, and understand that your options may be limited as such.

    Express your desire to learn. Watch people do what they do and ask them to teach you how. Whether it's fixing the tractor, or deciding on what to feed the cows, or understanding the plant cycle, you'll never become a farmer until you understand the hands-on "how" behind everything that makes a farm work.

    Have a good sense of humor. Laughter makes the day go by faster, especially when your muscles are aching and you feel like your fingers are going to fall off and the weather has ruined your plans once again. A positive attitude is an asset to any farm!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    51
    Rep Power
    10

    Default

    I wouldn’t mind having a little hobby farm in some nice location. I am not sure about big commercial farms, just do much work and rules and regulations to follow.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    10
    Rep Power
    9

    Default

    Have you checked in to rules and regulations that have to do with small farms and any legislation that might be coming before Congress that might add to rules and regulations over small farms? I've read that there are some bills that include them.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    10
    Rep Power
    9

    Default

    Yeah, farming is very expensive to get into by yourself because of the large tracts of land and equipment you need to generate even a meager income. I have a couple of friends who are farmers and they all agree that it's a lot of work for very little payoff. Dairy, grains, and meat are probably the most land and resource intensive, and smaller farmers are getting squeezed out by factory farms. Vegetables and possibly fruit orchards are probably a better choice to start a small farm with. Although in any small farm, you're going to be somewhat limited to farmers markets and co-ops to sell your products to.

    ________________
    Resume service- because an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    4
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    Thanks for this. I highly recommend that you look for an internship or program in farming before you make the career change. There are many programs that can match you with farmers that are looking for help and have specific experience in farmer training. Enjoy

    Joel

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    35
    Rep Power
    8

    Default

    I think farming is the great profession. If anyone decide he will be a farmer it is a very good decision for him and his society. Because by farming he beneficial financially and society beneficial for farming product.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
For Training Providers
List Your Courses
Our Site
Follow Us